FILM SELECTOR

REVIEWS AND TRAILERS

 Read reviews and check out the trailers for some of our upcoming screenings below:

 

The Power of the Dog (12A)

Jane Campion’s first feature film in more than 10 years is a western gothic psychodrama: mysterious, malicious, with a lethal ending that creeps up behind you like a thief … the big reveal delivers a retrospective mule-kick of significance. The audience has to piece together its meaning after the closing credits, going right back to the opening narrative voiceover … The Power of the Dog is a made with artistry and command: it is one of Jane Campion’s best. Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Watch the trailer here

 

Spencer (12A)

Kristen Stewart is masterful as Diana in this thrillingly gutsy, seductive film … The 31-year-old, who will be instantly and justifiably awards-tipped for this, navigates this perilous terrain with total mastery, getting the voice and mannerisms just right but vamping everything up just a notch, in order to better lean into the film’s melodramatic, paranoiac and absurdist swerves. Robbie Collin, The Telegraph

Watch the trailer here

 

Ghostbusters: Afterlife (12A)

Jason Reitman’s thoroughly lovely Ghostbusters: Afterlife doesn’t try to be exactly like the originals, made by his father, Ivan Reitman. A sequel-slash-restart, it instead shoots for its own version of goofy buddy comedy and funhouse scariness … It’s always fun, inventive and full of charm. If you have any concerns that Jason Reitman’s film might sully the legacy of his dad’s greatest creation, there’s nothing to be afraid of. Olly Richards, Empire

Watch the trailer here

 

Mothering Sunday (15)

It’s a richly detailed mosaic of a movie which pays as much attention to emotional authenticity – a dull ache of grief which is the aftermath of the First World War and a smouldering yearning between the two lovers – as it does to the story itself. The soul of the film comes from the chemistry between the mesmerising Young and the two men in her life: the sexual charge with O’Connor in the 1920s and the more cerebral spark with Donald (Sope Dirisu) in later life. Both relationships, although glimpsed in fractured slivers of memory, feel fleshed out and fully alive. Wendy Ide, Screendaily

Watch the trailer here

 

The Colour Room  (PG)

The film is as aesthetically pleasing as one can expect from a story celebrating a visual artist. McCarthy says that they put together an emotional and psychological palette for each scene, with only a specific range of colours used at each point to reflect the protagonist’s changing moods. The production effortlessly brings to life the artist’s vibrant world: from the smoking kilns to the jars of pigment in the colour room, every detail adds to the dynamic energy of the story.  Mersa Auda, The Upcoming

Watch the trailer here

 

A Boy Called Christmas (PG TBC)

Watch the trailer here

 

King Richard (12A)

King Richard, exec-produced by Venus and Serena, is a love letter to his dogged ambition, without which, they’ve said, they would never have become who they are. A biopic that doesn’t feel like a biopic, a sports film that doesn’t feel like a sports film, it’s a freewheeling but intense family drama, a tribute to the love that bound them – even if their father’s bullishness repeatedly threatened to break it all up. As stirring and heart-warming as you’d like, this is a hugely touching family opus. It’s nothing revolutionary, but it’s straight from the heart and gets you in the gut. Alex Godfrey, Empire

Watch the trailer here

 

Petite Maman (U)

Sciamma comes across as a supremely confident and graceful filmmaker here, resting her film entirely on careful shot selection, mood and her two young leads, rather than any expositionary bumph. Reunited with cinematographer Claire Mathon, Sciamma keeps the camera at her young heroes’ eye-level, framing the shots for their convenience rather than that of adults … A story even more delicate and moving than Sciamma’s last effort, this takes an unusual and thoughtful look at girlhood, motherhood and friendship. It’s enchanting. Helen O’Hara, Empire

Watch the trailer here

 

Encanto (PG)

Disney’s Encanto is, well, enchanting. It’s tricky to make an animated film so infused with exuberant sweetness without it becoming cloying. But this whimsical dose of magic realism set amid the lush greenery of the Colombian mountains benefits as much from the purity of the storytelling as the stunning vibrancy of the visuals … this is a film that commits to the timeless folklore of its South American setting to a transporting degree. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter

Watch the trailer here

 

House of Gucci (15)

House of Gucci is never knowingly underacted, and that’s a good thing. Ridley Scott’s sprawling, soapy, supremely entertaining account of how the Gucci family business gradually lost its family has lurid true-crime storytelling, shiny ‘80s needle-drops and to-die-and-kill-for costumes in every frame — but its chief asset is a cast that knows exactly what degree of too much is just right. Gucci is not a fashion label celebrated for its restraint … and the actors playing its last namesakes serve up a fittingly gaudy tribute, delivered in faux-Italian accents thicker than marinara sauce … Big is back, baby, and House of Gucci wears it well. Guy Lodge, Film of the week

Watch the trailer here